chevron-down
chevron-up

Best of est | New York City Lofts

  • Step inside four loft-style apartments that epitomise New York City living.

    In New York City, areas like SoHo, Tribeca and Manhattan were once hubs for the manufacturing industry, crawling with multi-storey, brick-clad warehouses and factories. Come the sixties and seventies, when many of these buildings were entering into obsoleteness, the city’s artists began repurposing them into hybrid live-work spaces, lured by their unprecedented size and lightness – and thus the loft was born.

    Being housed inside former industrial buildings, New York City lofts typically comprise an open plan with tall ceilings, large windows and few interior walls. Combined with stylistic elements such as exposed roof trusses and structural columns, they have quickly become one of the city’s most covetable homes.

    Tribeca Loft by Workstead | Photography by Matthew Williams

    Tribeca Loft

    Workstead

    “Loft apartments populate New York’s most desirable neighbourhoods; their wide, open interiors are part of the very magic that draws people to the city,” Workstead founder Stefanie Brechbuehler says. The Brooklyn-based multidisciplinary design studio are at the helm of this loft renovation in Tribeca, housed within a former spice warehouse. To honour the building’s history, the studio kept and restored its original fabric of masonry and timber and its exposed cast-iron pipes – now painted in shiny jet-black paint. “The pipes hold their visual own against the brick and timber,” Stefanie says. Careful not to disrupt the loft’s open plan, nor its receptiveness to natural light, Workstead crafted two sliding oak-and-glass doors to divide the living and private spaces. 

    Tribeca Loft by Workstead | Photography by Matthew Williams

    Tribeca Loft by Workstead | Photography by Matthew Williams

    Tribeca Loft by Workstead | Photography by Matthew Williams

    SoHo Loft

    GACHOT

    As its own private escape within the heart of New York City, SoHo Loft expands on an original 19th-century penthouse to create an entertainer’s paradise across multiple levels. SoHo-based interior design studio GACHOT worked closely with the client, who works in the fashion industry, to ensure the home reflected his unique personal style. While the home is steeped in a classic sensibility, pops of colour add movement to the spaces, and every element has been selected for its enduring beauty, defying trends. The iconic cast-ironic building that the residence is located within sits comfortably in its locale as a permanent reminder of the past, and as an identifier of a classically New York vernacular.

    Union Square Loft

    Worrell Yeung and Colony

    Brooklyn-based architecture studio Worrell Yeung joined forces with cooperative gallery, design studio and strategy firm Colony to transform the interiors of a century-old loft in the heart of Manhattan. At 3000 square feet, the loft occupies the entire third floor of a landmark Renaissance Revival-style building overlooking one of the city’s most famous parks, Union Square. Owned by a successful concert violinist, the loft doubles as a calming refuge or a lively space for gatherings and recitals. “Our strategy was to highlight the distinct nature of the loft – to express the original elements,” Max Worrell says. This was realised through a balanced approach to the architecture, preserving the building’s rich history while lifting it into its contemporary. 

    SoHo Loft

    LP Creative and Danielle Bernstein

    The Japanese philosophy of Wabi-sabi guided the redesign of this loft in SoHo by interior designer Lauren Piscione of LP Creative, together with long-term friend and homeowner Danielle Bernstein. The apartment is wrapped in warm, natural tones and earthen textures, creating a soothing sanctuary away from New York City’s bustle. The open-plan living and dining space reveals Lauren’s affinity for sensorial layering, where travertine, clay, timber, linen and cane harmoniously coexist. Here, you’ll find camel-coloured lime-washed walls, forming a tactile backdrop for Danielle Bernstein’s curation of vintage furniture.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Enquire Now