Rachel Jane has a confession: she has the worst taste in music and when she finds a song she will listen to it to death and then wait a few days and listen to it again.

Luckily for us we don’t ever have to listen to Jane’s eclectic taste in music, but we do however, get to look at her beautiful photographs.

Rachel Jane is the creative force behind Two Loves Studio – a food blog which combines Jane’s two passions – photography and cooking.

Beer Cupcakes Two Loves Studio Est Magazine

White Chocolate Two Loves Studio Est Magazine

A self-taught photographer, Jane’s introduction to food photography began a couple of years ago when she accidentally stumbled upon a local bookshop in Tasmania. After buying a copy of Helene Dujardin’s Plate to Pixel, Jane felt motivated to pursue her passion of taking food photographs.

Picking up a DSLR camera for the first time, Jane started creating her own mini photo shoots at home. In March 2012, she launched her blog Two Loves Studio (TLS) as a way of sharing her art with friends and other foodies.

“It’s hard to pin point exactly what (TLS) is … but what I can tell you is that, it’s a space where you can find honest thoughts, recipes, inspiration, darn good photos of real food,” explains Jane.

In just two years, Jane never could have imagined that her hobby would evolve into a career. After collaborating with magazines and other blogs including Vogue Living, Huffington Post, Bride Magazine, Sister Magazine and decor8, Jane was able to leave her full-time job to focus more on TLS.

Pizza Two Loves Studio Est Magazine

Fig salad Two Loves Studio Est Magazine

TLS is a collection of colourful photographs, delicious recipes and stories. A self-described perfectionist, Jane has a meticulous attention to detail, a feat rarely achieved in the sea of food blogs. She is able to beautifully translate the perceptions of taste, aroma and smell into a food photograph to wonderful effect.

Jane is enthusiastic about her work and believes that style is more important than quantity.

“A food blog for everyone is a food blog for no one,” she says. “Find an area of food and cooking that really excites you, that you are really passionate about and create it based on that niche idea. If you start on a blog based on something that makes you want to jump up and down with excitement, then it will both fulfill you and others will be able to share in your honest joy.”

We look forward to watching the growth of Two Loves Studio.

Rachel Jane has kindly shared her Red and Golden Beet Chips recipe. A healthier alternative to potato chips, we love the vibrant colours.

BY Francesca Carter

Beet chips Two Loves Studio Est Magazine


RED & GOLDEN BEET CHIPS


BY Rachel Jane

 

Ingredients

1 large red beet
1 bunch of small golden beets (approx. 5-6)
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 ground paprika
1 teaspoon chili flakes
Olive oil
Handful of fresh dill chopped

 

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 180 C (350 F) and get two large baking trays ready.

2. Wash and trim the beets. Use a peeler to remove the skin. Cut the beets into very thin slices. You can use a mandolin, or a sharp knife with a steady hand. Place the salt, paprika and chili flakes into a small bowl and mix. Set aside. In two larger bowls, place the golden slices in one and the red slices the other. Add half of the spice mix to each bowl, (this will ensure the red doesn’t stain the golden beets). Toss each bowl to coat with spices. Add a lug of olive oil to each bowl and coat.

3. Lay out the golden slices onto one tray. Make sure the slices are not over lapping so they can crisp up. Do the same with the red beets on the other tray. Sprinkle a quarter of the dill onto the golden beets and a quarter onto the red beets. Bake in the oven for 30 minutes. Then turn the oven down to 120 C (250 F) and bake for another 20-30 minutes or until nearly crisp. Remove the chips from the oven and place on a drying rack to crisp while they cool.

4. Place in a bowl ready to serve and sprinkle over the remaining fresh dill. Serve with BBQ sauce.

Notes

For best results, I watched the chips closely. Smaller chips will crisp up more quickly and if your oven has hot spots like mine, those in the hot spots will also crisp up more quickly. I removed the ones that I could see were ready and put them on the drying rack. The stubborn ones that would not crisp in the oven, I left a little longer after the cooking time and bumped up the temperature to 140 C.

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